Baby acne vs eczema | The Best Treatment for baby

By | November 6, 2021
baby acne on baby face

Treatment

Ask your doctor to prescribe more effective prescription treatments for you if you’ve used over-the-counter baby acne solutions for several weeks and they haven’t helped. A dermatologist can assist you with the following issues:

  • Baby Acne treatment

Preventing scarring and other skin damage
As much as possible, conceal the scars.
Acne treatments reduce oil production and puffiness, or they cure a bacterial infection. Most prescriptions for baby acne medicines don’t start working until four to eight weeks after you’ve been using them. Acne therapy can take months or even years to entirely clear up.

Your doctor will choose a treatment plan for you based on your age, the type and severity of your acne, and your desire to follow it. For example, you might have to cleanse the damaged area twice a day and apply medication to it for a few weeks. Topical drugs are frequently used in conjunction with oral treatments (oral medications). It’s worth emphasizing that, due to the possibility of adverse effects, therapy options for pregnant women are limited.

Discuss the risks and advantages of any drugs or other therapies you’re considering with your doctor. Make meetings with him every three to six months until your skin begins to improve.

  • Medications for the skin

baby acne treatment

 

The following are the most commonly prescribed acne as well as baby acne topical medications:

Retinoids and retinol-like drugs are retinoids and retinoid-like pharmaceuticals that are used to treat acne.
For mild acne, retinoic acid or tretinoin-containing medications are frequently effective. Creams, gels, and liquid preparations are available for these drugs. * Tretinoin (Avita, Retin-A, and other brands), adapalene (Differin), and tazarotene (Tazorac, Average, and other brands) are just a few examples. This medicine should be taken in the evening, and the amount should be increased to three times per week once your skin has been accustomed to it. Once your skin has become accustomed to it, you can use it on a regular basis. Keeps hair follicles from clogging up. Tretinoin and benzoyl peroxide should not be used together.

Topical retinoids increase the sensitivity of your skin to the sun. It can also make your skin dry and red, especially if you’re a person of color. Adapalene is a more tolerable drug.

Antibiotics for baby acne?? Is it ok

These drugs operate by killing bacteria on the skin and lowering inflammation and redness.
For the first few months of treatment, you can take both a retinoid and an antibiotic, with the antibiotic in the morning and the retinoid in the evening.
To lessen the risk of antibiotic resistance, antibiotics are frequently used with benzoyl peroxide.
Clindamycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzaclin, Duac, and other brands) and erythromycin with benzoyl peroxide (Benzamycin) are two examples.
Topical antibiotics are not indicated on their own.

Azelaic acid and salicylic acid are two types of azelaic acid. Azelaic acid is a naturally occurring acid that is created by yeast. It’s antimicrobial in nature. When used twice a day, azelaic acid 20 percent cream or gel looks to be as effective as many conventional acne treatments. During pregnancy and breastfeeding, prescription azelaic acid (Azelaic, Vinacea) is an alternative. It can also be used to treat some types of acne-related skin discoloration. Skin redness and minor itching are possible side effects.

Salicylic acid, which is available in wash-and-leave treatments, may help prevent hair follicle blockages. There are only a few studies that prove how effective it is. Skin darkening and minor skin irritation are possible side effects. For the treatment of inflammatory acne, dapsone gel (Axone) 5% is indicated twice a day, especially in women with acne vulgaris. Redness and dryness are two common side effects.

The use of zinc, sulfur, nicotinamide, resorcinol, sodium sulfacetamide, or aluminum chloride in topical acne therapies is not well supported by evidence.

Medications are taken orally

Antibiotics:

To minimize bacteria, you may need to take oral antibiotics if you have to moderate-severe baby acne on your child’s face. Tetracycline (minocycline, doxycycline) or a macrolide are commonly used to treat acne (erythromycin, azithromycin). People who cannot take tetracycline, such as pregnant women and children under the age of eight, may benefit from a macrolide. Antibiotics should be taken for an as little period as feasible to avoid antibiotic resistance. To lessen the danger of antibiotic resistance, it should be used in conjunction with other drugs such as benzoyl peroxide. Antibiotics for baby acne treatment rarely cause severe negative effects. However, these drugs make your skin more sensitive to the sun.

Oral contraceptives in combination:

Four combination oral contraceptives have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat acne in women who also want to take them to prevent pregnancy. These are progestin and estrogen-containing products (Ortho Tri-Cyclen 21, Yaz, others). Because the advantages of this treatment may take a few months to manifest, utilizing other acne treatments alongside it for the initial few weeks may be beneficial. Antibiotics should be taken for an as little period as feasible to avoid antibiotic resistance. To lessen the danger of antibiotic resistance, it should be used in conjunction with other drugs such as benzoyl peroxide. Antibiotics for acne treatment rarely cause severe negative effects. However, these drugs make your skin more sensitive to the sun.

Oral contraceptives in combination:

Four combination oral contraceptives have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat acne in women who also want to take them to prevent pregnancy. These are progestin and estrogen-containing products (Ortho Tri-Cyclen 21, Yaz, others). Because the advantages of this treatment may take a few months to manifest, utilizing other acne treatments alongside it for the initial few weeks may be beneficial. Weight gain, breast discomfort, and nausea are all common side effects of combination oral contraceptives. A higher risk of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, and cervical cancer has also been linked to these drugs. oral antibiotics do not help for babies for their baby acne on the face. women and teenage girls should consider spironolactone (Aldactone). It works by preventing androgen hormones from affecting the oil glands. Breast soreness and unpleasant menstruation cycles are two possible side effects.

Isotretinoin:

Isotretinoin (Amnesteem, Claravis, and other brands) is a vitamin A-derived chemical that can be used to treat moderate to severe acne that hasn’t responded to conventional therapies. Inflammatory bowel illness, depression, and serious birth abnormalities are all possible side effects of oral isotretinoin. All persons taking isotretinoin, however, must follow the FDA-approved risk management regimen. They’ll have to see their doctors on a frequent basis to check for negative effects.

Treatments:

The following treatments, either alone or in combination with drugs, may be beneficial for some people.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment that uses light to

A variety of light-based therapies have been explored and found to be effective in some cases. The majority of these necessitate numerous doctor visits. However, additional research is needed to find the best approach, light source, and dose.

Peeling with chemicals:

A chemical solution, such as salicylic acid, glycolic acid, or retinoic acid, is applied repeatedly in this therapy. It’s an effective acne therapy for mild cases. It may improve the appearance of the skin, but the impact is temporary, and the therapy must usually be repeated.

Drainage and extraction are two different things:

Your doctor may use special instruments to carefully remove whiteheads and blackheads (comedies), as well as cysts that haven’t responded to topical treatments. This procedure improves the appearance of your skin for a short time, but it can also result in scarring.

Injections of steroids:

Injections of steroid medicine can be used to treat nodular and cystic lesions. This treatment has resulted in speedy improvement as well as pain relief. Skin thinning and discoloration in the treated region are possible side effects.

Therapy for children:

The majority of acne medication research has been done on people aged 12 and up. Acne appears to be affecting more and more young children. The number of topical treatments approved for use in children by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has increased. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, topical benzoyl peroxide, adapalene, and tretinoin are effective in pre-teens and do not raise the risk of side effects. Consider consulting a pediatric dermatologist if your child has acne. Inquire about medications that should not be given to children, proper dosages, drug interactions, side effects, and how the treatment affects the child’s growth and development.

 

baby acne best treatment

Trials in the clinic:

Learn about new therapies, medical interventions, and diagnostics that are being used to prevent, treat, and manage this health issue in Mayo Clinic research. Complementary and alternative medicine Some complementary and alternative medicine techniques may be beneficial for baby acne treatment :

Tea tree oil is a natural antiseptic:
Tea tree oil gels with at least 5% tea tree oil may be as effective as lotions with 5% benzoyl peroxide, however tea tree oil products take a long time to work. Minor itching, burning, redness, and dryness are all possible adverse effects, making it inappropriate for those with rosacea.

Brewer’s yeast is a type of yeast that is used to make beer:

When taken orally, the Hansen CBS strain of brewer’s yeast has been demonstrated to help reduce acne. However, it is possible that it will induce gas (flatulence).
More research is needed to determine the efficacy and long-term safety of these, as well as other integrative techniques like biofeedback and Ayurvedic medicines. Before attempting any therapies, speak with your doctor about the benefits and drawbacks.

Home remedies and a healthy lifestyle

Over-the-counter treatments, as well as basic excellent skincare and other personal care procedures, can help prevent or control mild to moderate baby acne from your baby face.

Use a gentle detergent to clean the damaged areas.

Wash your face twice a day with warm water and a gentle soap or cleanser (Cetaphil, Vanicream, or others). If you have greasy hair, shampoo it every day. When shaving the affected area of your skin, use caution. Face scrubs, astringents, and face masks are all things to avoid. They irritate the skin and can aggravate the problem. Excessive skin cleaning and peeling affect the skin as well.

To dry up extra oils and enhance exfoliation, use over-the-counter acne treatment solutions.

Look for products that include the active component benzoyl peroxide. You can also utilize salicylic acid, glycolic acid, or alpha hydroxy acids-containing products. It’s possible that you won’t notice any changes for a few weeks after starting to use the product. Creams, as opposed to gels or ointments, generate fewer acne breakouts. Redness, dryness, and scaling are common adverse effects of over-the-counter acne treatments, but they usually go away after a month of use.

Irritants should be avoided.

Cosmetics that are greasy or oily, sunscreen, hair-styling products, or acne concealers might aggravate the problem. Instead, look for products that are water-based or non-comedogenic (meaning they don’t clog pores) because they are less likely to trigger acne.

The skin should be protected from the sun’s rays.

The sun causes skin discoloration, which might last even after acne has cleared up for some people. Some acne medicines can increase your chances of getting sunburned. Check with your doctor to check if the drug you’re taking belongs to this category. If you have one of them, try to stay out of the sun as much as possible. Apply a non-oily (non-comedogenic) moisturizer with sun blockers on a regular basis.

Rubbing or squeezing your skin is not a good idea.

Phones, helmets, collars or tight belts, and backpacks should all be avoided if you have acne-prone skin.

Acne-prone regions should not be touched or peeled.

More acne, infection, or scarring may result as a result of this.

Following the strenuous activity, take a shower.
Acne breakouts can be caused by the presence of oils and sweat on your skin.

Adaptation and support

Acne and acne scars can make you feel anxious and have a negative impact on your social life and self-esteem. Talking to your family, joining a support group, or seeing a counselor can all be beneficial. Acne can be aggravated by stress. Get enough sleep and practice relaxation techniques to help you cope with stress.

Get ready for your meeting for your acne as well as your baby acne.

Make an appointment with your doctor if your acne isn’t responding to self-care or over-the-counter remedies. Acne therapy that begins early and is effective decreases the chance of scarring and long-term damage to your self-esteem. Your doctor may recommend you to a specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of skin disorders after an initial examination (dermatologist).

Here’s some information to help you prepare for your consultation.

What you can do to help

Make a list of your important medical information,

including any additional medical conditions you may have and any prescription or over-the-counter medications, you’re taking, including vitamins and nutritional supplements.

Make a list of questions for your doctor to answer.
You may make the most of your time with your doctor by preparing a list of questions ahead of time.

Here are some fundamental acne-related questions to ask your doctor. Feel free to ask any further questions during your stay.

1. What method of treatment do you propose for me?
2. What would you suggest as a follow-up treatment if the first wasn’t successful?
3. What are the meds you’re prescribing are potential negative effects?
4. How long can I safely take the medication provided to me?
5. What is the likelihood that my symptoms will begin to improve as *soon as I begin treatment?
6. When will the next visit be to examine the treatment’s feasibility?
7. Is it safe to cease treatment if it appears to be ineffective?
8. What health-care measures could help me get rid of my symptoms?
9. Do you think I should make any dietary changes?
10. Do you think I should switch the over-the-counter skincare products I’m using, such as soaps, lotions, sunscreens, and cosmetics?

What do you hope to get out of your doctor’s?

Your doctor will almost certainly ask you a series of questions about baby acne on your bay’s face. Being prepared to respond to them may allow you to spend more time discussing any things you wish to go into in-depth. The following are some of the questions your doctor might ask you:

When did you first become aware of the issue?
Have you observed anything that causes acne outbreaks, such as stress or the start of your menstruation (for both girls and women)?

What drugs, including prescription and over-the-counter, vitamins, and nutritional supplements do you take?
For women and girls: Do you use birth control tablets to keep yourself in check?
For women and girls: Is your menstrual cycle consistent?
For women and girls: Are you expecting a baby or planning to get pregnant soon?
Which soaps, lotions, sunscreens, hair care products, and cosmetics do you use?

What impact does acne have on your self-esteem and social confidence?
Is there a history of acne in your family?
What skincare treatments and self-care routines have you tried thus far? Has the efficacy of any of these treatments or procedures been established?
Is there a family member who has used isotretinoin or hormonal therapy to treat acne? Have any of these treatments been proved to be successful?

Reference by

Elizabeth Gutmark, MD

Dermatologist

 

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